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Attorneys and Families Take a Trip Down Sugar Creek

August 13, 2018

Woodard Emhardt attorneys enjoy canoeing with family on Sugar Creek in Montgomery County. Weather cooperated by providing enough water in advance to move the canoes along the creek. Perfect conditions for the day were dry and a bit overcast and a great time was had by all. A picnic lunch rounded out the excursion.

Trip Down Sugar Creek


FlightAware and Aireon’s GlobalBeacon Product To Test Real-Time Global Aircraft Tracking

June 19, 2018

Beginning in November 2018, Woodard, Emhardt, Moriarty, McNett & Henry (WEMMH) client FlightAware, along with Aireon, will utilize their revolutionary GlobalBeacon product to test real-time tracking of global aircraft. Airlines and aircraft operators will be expected to track their fleet globally at a frequency of one position every 15 minutes during normal operations. By 2021, they will be required to automatically receive positions once every minute for aircraft in distress.

GlobalBeacon provides the most simple and cost-effective solution for the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Global Aeronautical Distress Safety System (GADSS). By combining FlightAware’s data processing platform and web-interface with Aireon’s space-based ADS-B network, GlobalBeacon transcends borders and Flight Information Regions (FIRS) and provides 100% global coverage, including over deserts, polar airspace and oceanic regions. Therefore, airlines and aircraft operators are able to exceed GADSS standards and recommended practices for flight tracking.

Aircraft equipped with ADS-B Out transponders are tracked automatically with their position broadcast in real-time. Since ADS-B Out 1090MHz is mandated throughout the world, most aircraft do not require additional equipment to take advantage of GlobalBeacon.

FlightAware is the world’s largest flight tracking data company and provides over 10,000 aircraft operators and service companies, as well as over 12,000,000 passengers with global flight tracking solutions. FlightAware leverages data from air traffic control systems in over 55 countries, from its network of ADS-B ground stations in over 175 countries, from Aireon space-based global ADS-B, and using global datalink (satellite/VHF) via every major provider, including ARINC, SITA, Satcom Direct, Garmin, Honeywell GDC, and UVdatalink.

The FlightAware HyperFeed™ engine’s seamless integration of thousands of real-time, worldwide data sources combined with its powerful, intuitive, responsive and reliable web-based interfaces and data feeds yield the most capable and useful flight tracking application and service. FlightAware is the first company to offer free flight tracking services for both private and commercial air traffic and quickly rose to become the most popular flight tracking service.

WEMMH patent attorneys John McNett (a licensed pilot) and Bill McKenna worked with three tech-savvy pilots, led by Daniel Baker to obtain 12 U.S. patents, addressing numerous features of their rapidly growing business when FlightAware was created in 2005. WEMMH has also secured trademark registrations in over 50 jurisdictions throughout the world to protect the FlightAware brand. See their website at www.flightaware.com or download their app on your smartphone.


Partners Dan Lueders and Chuck Schmal Named Members of the Global IP Star Rankings

June 8, 2018

Partners Dan Lueders and Chuck Schmal were officially announced as members of the Global IP Star rankings in the May edition of Managing Intellectual Property IP Stars 2018/19. IP Stars is the leading specialist guide to IP firms and practitioners worldwide. Managing IP has been researching and ranking firms since 1996. This research has expanded over the years, with more than 80 jurisdictions now covered, making it the most comprehensive and authoritative analysis of the industry. The guide is viewed each month by over 25,900 users from 142 jurisdictions online, and the print versions are sent to over 10,000 IP Practitioners globally each year.

Congratulations, Dan and Chuck!


Steve Zlatos, Honorary Consul for Slovakia in Indiana, Part of Indiana Trade Mission

May 31, 2018

During a recent trip to Slovakia, organized in part by Woodard Emhardt Of-Counsel Steve Zlatos, Governor Eric Holcomb signed a memorandum of understanding with the minister of economy from Slovakia. The trip was arranged with the aim to build on established relationships between Indiana and Slovakia.

The focus of the gathering was to identify and enhance collaborative efforts toward two-way investment, trade and workforce development. Opportunities exist in the areas of advanced manufacturing, defense, automotive, energy, agriculture technology, information technology, cybersecurity as well as educational areas. Slovakia has been cooperating with the Indiana National Guard since 1994 and there has been a mutual interest in deepening cooperation beyond the sphere of defense. Indiana University and Purdue University currently have connections to academic institutions in Slovakia.

In addition to Governor Holcomb and Mr. Zlatos, the group from Indiana included U.S. Ambassador to Slovakia Adam Sterling, Indiana House Speaker Brian Bosma and wife Cheryl, First Lady Janet Holcomb, Senate President Pro Tem David Long and wife Melissa, and General Courtney Carr, head of the Indiana National Guard. The team met in Bratislava with President of Slovakia, Andrej Kiska, and the Prime Minister, Peter Pellegrini.

A large community of Slovaks lives in Indiana, while Indianapolis is home to the Slovak honorary consulate headed by Steve Zlatos.

Honorary Consul for Slovakia in Indiana


Charlie Meyer Quoted In Indiana Lawyer: “Chinese tariffs shed light on theft of American IP”

May 9, 2018

The brewing trade war between the United States and China has shone a renewed spotlight on a longstanding source of contention between the two economies: intellectual property theft.

President Donald Trump announced on March 22 the U.S. would impose tariffs on Chinese imports in response to Chinese theft of American IP, and since then the two nations have engaged in a series of retaliatory economic sanctions. While trade experts say the back-and-forth could give rise to a global trade war, IP law experts say the debate underscores the need for stronger intellectual property protections in America and abroad.

Most IP attorneys say across the country, inventors and innovators can take only a reactive, rather than proactive, approach to protecting their work. But experts also say Indiana has a unique approach to IP law that sets the state apart as a model for strong intellectual property defense.

Specifically looking to the patent side of IP law, it’s also common for overseas markets to produce goods covered by American patents, then import them back into the states for a profit, said Charlie Meyer of the IP firm Woodard, Emhardt, Moriarty, McNett & Henry LLP. Alternatively, Chinese manufacturers of American goods often take American molds and use them to create identical, but knockoff, goods, Meyer said.

Read the entire Indiana Lawyer article here.


Client Mr. Canary Co. Showcases Breakthrough Bird Feeding Product on Home Shopping Network (HSN)

May 9, 2018

Are you a bird lover? This one is for you!

On Tuesday, Carmel-based Mr. Canary Co. released a revolutionary product on the Home Shopping Network (HSN). Mr. Canary has been selling their bird feeders through major retailers since 1995.

Mr. Canary touts the invention as merely TV dinners for birds, which is a maintenance-free avenue to enjoy backyard birds. Basically, premium bird seed is sealed in single-use and eco-friendly trays, which slide into a permanent bird feeder. Bonus being: users don’t have to worry about hauling bird seed bags to the backyard and the cleanup is simple. The system ranges from $34.99 to $39.99.

Bird Feeder

Sisters Jan Long and Chris Mowery bought the Mr. Canary brand in 1995. By 2013, Mr. Canary products were being sold in Kmart, WalMart and Kroger stores across the nation. Ace Hardware signed on in 2014, as well.

Chuck Schmal of Woodard, Emhardt, Moriarty, Mc Nett & Henry LLP, along with Long worked together to secure a patent on the Bird Buffet System (US 9,686,968).

For more information, please refer to: https://www.ibj.com/articles/68556-carmel-based-mr-canary-to-debut-on-home-shopping-network?utm_source=ibj-daily&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_campaign=2018-04-26


Ounce of Prevention for Business IP Assets Worth Pound of Cure By Chris Brown

April 18, 2018

It may sound exhausting. Your client is focused on starting a new business and of course, they have plenty on their plate. Purchasing equipment and inventory, leasing premises (if not operating from home), arranging sales and/or other business development opportunities, as well as getting the word out on the new business will take every bit of a 24-hour day.

However, the fruits of labor will pay off. Indiana offers an easy online filing system as well as access to many other resources. Organizing a business structure may just be the easiest step.

Your client needs strategies and concepts regarding the intellectual property assets encompassed in the new business even before the articles of incorporation are filed. Many pieces may already have been created and others will be developed as the business grows. Remember, as with any other task, an ounce of prevention in the form of planning for intellectual property is worth at least a pound of cure, especially when the client is engaged with the day-to-day efforts of running the business.

Trademarks and Trade Names

Clients may not understand that adopting a company or corporation name (even one not used as a brand) can result in unfair competition claims under the federal Lanham Act (e.g. 35 U.S.C.§ 1125) or state law.

I’ve seen clients that have incorrectly assumed that registration of their company name is without consequence. I’ve also experienced that similar misconceptions arise with domain names. Most states, Indiana included, do not have a process to evaluate the likelihood of consumer confusion among corporate names. If Indiana does not find a match with an existing corporate name, it will usually go ahead and register the name. The same goes with domain names. If a registrar does not find a match with an existing domain name, the registration will proceed. Only later may the client discover that there is a non-identical, yet potentially confusing domain name, corporate name or trademark that has already been registered by another entity.

Indiana has a searchable database of registered business names: https://bsd.sos.in.gov/publicbusinesssearch. Once your client has decided upon a company name, guide them to take the simple step of searching the Indiana database to review any similar names and the business they conduct. Note that this review is not comprehensive. However, it can be utilized to locate and avoid specific pitfalls. Your client can also arrange for more in-depth searches. Again, before the corporate articles are filed, a basic, quick search is highly recommended.

Trade Secrets

If the client has no employees, trade secret issues may be minimal. The new businessperson always needs to be aware of what business information is valuable and safeguard that information. The easiest step is to keep such information locked away when not in use, whether digitally (separate server or drive) or physically.

When employees, investors, or corporate officers come into the picture, the small-business person needs to consider who needs access to valuable information and how to compartmentalize it. A good practice is to get written agreements from employees and others involved with the business that include clauses requiring them to use such information for the business, and not for themselves. Also, keep a log of people admitted to nonpublic areas of the business’ premises, and have them sign a short agreement not to divulge what they observe or learn.

Patents

Not all new businesses will include an inventive product, method, or device as part of its plan. However, a new businessperson needs to know that the clock starts ticking on applying for a patent in the United States when an invention is “ready for patenting” and non-confidentially disclosed or otherwise made public. Once that happens, the client has one year from such publication to file a U.S. application. Accordingly, as a new business is formed, Quick decisions concerning a patent search or application and secrecy agreements (preferably written) with investors, employees or others may be needed.

Copyrights

Copyright automatically exists in an “original work of authorship” as soon as it is “fixed in a tangible medium of expression.” A copyright is initially owned by the author unless (1) assigned by the author, or (2) a “work made for hire,” i.e. made by an employee in the scope of employment.

When others are the authors, the new businessperson must be aware that he or she may not own, and may even have limited rights to, materials created for the business. Web designers, for example, may retain ownership of copyright, and while the new business may use material created by the web designer, the businessperson may have limited ability to alter or add to the material. The new business needs to be aware of, or negotiate away, any such limitations.

The number of people who assume that material on the internet or posted on social media is free for anyone’s use is remarkable. Informational sites frequently allow a license to use material for noncommercial or educational purposes. However, know that the new businessperson (your client) needs to investigate and observe such licenses, where they exist. Fair uses are permitted by statute (17 USC 107), but are generally not associated with commercial use of copyrighted material. It is vital for a new businessperson to remember that photographs, text or other online material are rarely free for the taking.

Winding it Down

As with life in general, whether a business is large or small, it does not last forever. Intangible property should be treated with as much care as tangible property. Hoosiers may remember when the Roselyn Bakery chain ceased operation, but the trademarks and associated goodwill were valuable assets that continued in use.

Intellectual property can pass by assignment or by operation of law. In a bankruptcy, patents, copyrights, trademarks (with associated goodwill) and trade secrets may be sold or assigned for the benefit of creditors. In the winding up of a corporation or limited liability company, intellectual property must be considered in the disposition of all property. While it may seem that there need be little or no concern for intellectual property in a soon-to-be defunct small business, potentially valuable rights are at least in ownership limbo and may be lost if provision for them is not made in the winding down.

In a noncorporate business, where any intellectual property owned by the “business” is in fact owned by the individual proprietor, winding down the business may have little effect on the property of the business — it remains owned by the proprietor. However, in such cases any intellectual property — which can include copyright in personal and business papers — transfers on the death of the owner occur according to a residuary clause in his or her will, or according to the applicable law of interstate succession.

To view the article in The Indiana Lawyer click here.


Inventor Michael Duff Featured in STRINGS Magazine

April 3, 2018

Michael Duff is a world class craftsman behind some of the world’s greatest violinists and stringed musicians. Duff was recently awarded a U.S. Patent for innovating a new bow, including a novel frog part of the bow.

Stringed musical instruments such as the violin, viola, cello and stringed bass use bows to create classic and timeless music. Duff is the proprietor of Berg Bows® International in Bloomington, Indiana in 1985. https://www.bergbows.com/ As a former faculty member of Indiana University’s Department of Microbiology, he utilizes his scientifically trained mind and prides himself in being involved in the handcrafting of each and every bow.

Innovating New Bow

Michael enlisted the assistance of Dan Lueders of Woodard Emhardt Moriarty McNett & Henry. In November 2017, Berg Bows International received a patent (U.S. 9,830,892 B1) for all violin, viola and cello bows with Berg “Sound Stick” Technology. His inventive bow was featured in Strings magazine.

For more information, please refer to http://stringsmagazine.com/bow-maker-michael-duffs-new-line-includes-hybrid-materials/


Indiana Super Lawyers Honors Four Woodard, Emhardt, Moriarty, McNett & Henry LLP Partners

February 21, 2018

Four partners from Woodard, Emhardt, Moriarty, McNett & Henry LLP have been named to the 2018 Indiana Super Lawyers and Rising Stars lists.

The following attorneys were included on the Super Lawyers list:
• Thomas Q. Henry – Intellectual Property
• Spiro Bereveskos – Intellectual Property Litigation
• Daniel J. Lueders – Intellectual Property Litigation

The following attorney was named to the Rising Stars list:
• William A. McKenna – Intellectual Property Litigation

Super Lawyers is an annual rating service of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. The patented selection process includes independent research, statewide nominations and peer evaluations. Only the top 5 percent of Indiana’s attorneys are selected among the state’s most elite. All honorees are listed on the Super Lawyers website at www.superlawyers.com.

The “Rising Stars” designation honors leading attorneys who are 40 years or younger or have been practicing for 10 years or less.


Woodard, Emhardt, Moriarty, McNett & Henry LLP Promotes Two to Partnership

January 3, 2018

Woodard, Emhardt, Moriarty, McNett & Henry LLP is proud to announce that Jeremy Gustrowsky and Michael Morris have been named to the firm’s partnership, which was effective January 1, 2018.

Jeremy Gustrowsky focuses on all areas of intellectual property. He assists clients with a wide variety of needs to plan and execute strategies for protecting their ideas and branding their products and services. He has significant experience in preparing and prosecuting patent applications in the U.S. and abroad for a broad range of products. He also assists in litigation and dispute resolution matters.
He is a graduate of Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law (J.D., 2010) and University of North Carolina at Asheville (B.S., 1999)

Michael Morris practices in all areas of intellectual property, including providing services for identifying, procuring, and enforcing intellectual property rights. In particular, he has significant experience in preparing and prosecuting medical device and mechanical patent applications in the U.S. and abroad; providing freedom-to-operate, infringement/non-infringement, invalidity/validity opinions and monitoring competitor IP.
He is a graduate of Indiana University Maurer School of Law (J.D., 2011) and Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology (B.S., 2008)

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